Glaucoma Specialist

More than 3 million Americans have glaucoma and many more are at risk for developing the disease. At his practice on Manhattan's Upper West Side, Dr. Nightingale uses an array of treatments, including medication, laser therapy and surgery, to help New York City patients effectively manage glaucoma and prevent vision loss.

Glaucoma Details

Jeffrey Nightingale, MD FACS

What is glaucoma?

Glaucoma is an eye condition that occurs when the pressure inside the eye – the intraocular pressure – builds up, squeezing the optic nerve that sends vision messages to the brain and eventually causing permanent blindness. There are two primary types of glaucoma – open-angle and angle closure. The angle refers to the opening between the iris – the colored portion of your eye – and the clear covering of the eye called the cornea. Open-angle glaucoma is far more common than angle-closure glaucoma, accounting for about 90 percent of all cases. Several other less common types of glaucoma also exist, including normal tension glaucoma which causes damage to the optic nerve even when intraocular pressure is not substantially increased.

How does glaucoma occur?

Your eye contains a viscous (thick) fluid that helps lubricate the eye and facilitate good vision. In a healthy eye, the fluid is constantly replenished. But in glaucoma, the tiny channels that enable the eye to drain “old” fluid become blocked, resulting in fluid buildup that causes the interior pressure of the eye to rise – sometimes very quickly and dramatically (angle closure glaucoma) and sometimes more slowly over time (open-angle glaucoma). Glaucoma is much more common in people with diabetes, high blood pressure and heart disease, as well as those who are older and those with a family history of the disease.

How is glaucoma treated?

In many cases, glaucoma can be treated with special prescription eye drops, sometimes given in combination with oral medications to help lower the intraocular pressure. Laser and other types of surgery can also be used to “unclog” the eye's drainage canals to improve the drainage of the fluid inside the eye. In most cases, surgery is used when drops and oral medications prove ineffective in reducing intraocular pressure.

Major Insurance Plans Accepted

Please take a look at the following list of plans we accept. Please contact our office if you do not see your insurance provider listed below.

  Regence Blue Cross Blue Shield
1199SEIU
AARP
Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield
Anthem Blue Cross of California
Arkansas Blue Cross Blue Shield
Beech Street
Blue Cross Blue Shield
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Florida (Florida Blue)
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Texas
Blue Cross Blue Shield of Western New York
Blue Cross of Northeastern Pennsylvania
Blue Shield of California
Blue Shield of Northeastern New York
Testimonials

Words from our patients

  • Yelp

    "He took the time to talk to me and explain the test I was undergoing and he listened to my concerns. "

    Benson Y.
  • RateMDs

    "I found him to be very warm, personable and attentive. Most important for me was that he projects a real sense of concern, experience and confidence."

    Anonymous
  • Vitals

    "He cares about me beyond being a patient and in today's world that kind of relationship is hard to come by."

    Anonymous
  • Yelp

    "His professionalism had put my mind at ease and I felt that I was in good hands with him. "

    Alice C.
  • Yelp

    "He is absolutely fantastic. From start to finish, he has been incredibly thoughtful and attentive. I have convinced my wife to also get LASIK with him. "

    Danny H.
Location
Jeffrey Nightingale, MD FACS
211 Central Park West, Suite 1E
Upper Westside

New York, NY 10024
Phone: 212-877-7188
Fax: 212-877-3912
Office Hours

Get in touch

212-877-7188

Jeffrey Nightingale, MD FACS
211 Central Park West
Suite 1E
New York, NY 10024